Tier 1 National Org

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Today, May 27

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    11:49am
    Changes to Body
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    waldorp_article.pdf [1]
      
     
    Check out the article in the Los Angeles/Orange County BuildingTrades News!!
     
    Check out the article in the Los Angeles/Orange County BuildingTrades News!!
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    waldorp_article.pdf [1]
     
     
     
    [1] https://www.baclocals.org/system/files/waldorp_article.pdf
     
    [1] https://www.baclocals.org/system/files/waldorp_article.pdf
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  • Your profile picture
    11:48am
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    waldorp_article.pdf [1]
     
    waldorp_article.pdf [1]
      +
    Check out the article in the Los Angeles/Orange County BuildingTrades News!!
     
     
     
    [1] https://www.baclocals.org/system/files/waldorp_article.pdf
     
    [1] https://www.baclocals.org/system/files/waldorp_article.pdf
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    11:34am
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    Semi-Annual General Union Meeting
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    Local #4 Members Make a Masterpiece in Beverly Hills, Ca
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    The Semi-Annual Union General Meeting for Local #4 was held Saturday 5/6/2017. The members in attendance all rose for the Pledge of Allegiance to start the meeting called by Lupe Aldaco the President. The reading of the previous meeting minutes were read by Sec/Treasurer Chad Boggio and a Motion and second were made to approve the minutes. The finances of the Local were presented and motion made second to approve the financials. The Field Representative all gave reports of work. A report was given on the Dues Resolution that was voted on. It was reporteed that the dues resolution was passed by the membership 265 for -20 against. There was a report of the tile negotiations given by Chad Boggio. Robert Collins gave a report on the Brick Masons Apprentice Program. Under good and welfare Phil Morris made a motion to have the other trades that Local #4 represent be listed on the front of Local #4's building. There was a motion made and seconded to make it happen. The members all stood for a moment of silence for recently departed members. There was a motion and second to adjourn the Union Meeting. There was a raffle for prizes.
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    waldorp_article.pdf [1]
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    [1] https://www.baclocals.org/system/files/waldorp_article.pdf
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Thursday, May 25

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    5:11pm
    Yin Yin updated Resources
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    Organizing
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    Resources
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    5:10pm
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    5:09pm
    admin created Resources

    test test 

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    4:36pm

  • Your profile picture
    2:10pm

    We can make real progress by incorporating prevailing wage standards into state housing reforms.

    Housing prices have soared as much as 54% faster than inflation over the past twenty years, but real wages for nearly a million Californians who work in the construction industry have actually declined by 25%. The median wage of $35,000 per year prices most construction workers out of the housing market—particularly in high cost coastal cities.

  • Your profile picture
    2:07pm

    Dear Governor Brown and California State Legislators:

    To solve California’s housing crisis, we must take steps to increase our housing supply and close the affordability gap for working families.

    We can make real progress by incorporating prevailing wage standards into state housing reforms.

    Housing prices have soared as much as 54% faster than inflation over the past twenty years, but real wages for nearly a million Californians who work in the construction industry have actually declined by 25%. The median wage of $35,000 per year prices most construction workers out of the housing market—particularly in high cost coastal cities.

    Housing reforms that fail to include prevailing wage standards will only make these problems worse. 

    Long associated with more local hiring and stronger economic outcomes, prevailing wages are the local market based minimum wage for skilled construction work. By raising the “floor,” these standards can help close the affordability gap by pulling thousands of construction workers out of poverty and reducing income disparities that disproportionately impact people of color. Real housing reform needs to do more than simply streamline more development. We need to promote investment in the people who are doing the building, and struggling to pay the rent in our communities.

    Please include prevailing wage standards in your state housing reform package.

  • Your profile picture
    2:05pm

    Dear Governor Brown and California State Legislators:

    To solve California’s housing crisis, we must take steps to increase our housing supply and close the affordability gap for working families.

    We can make real progress by incorporating prevailing wage standards into state housing reforms.

    Housing prices have soared as much as 54% faster than inflation over the past twenty years, but real wages for nearly a million Californians who work in the construction industry have actually declined by 25%. The median wage of $35,000 per year prices most construction workers out of the housing market—particularly in high cost coastal cities.

    In fact, most are immigrants and people of color earning $.70 on the dollar of similarly skilled white workers. Nearly half have no health insurance, and one in six face some form of wage theft.

    Most research shows that low wages reduces productivity and invites workforce shortages. It takes 13% more workers today to equal California’s construction output of twenty years ago. Low wages will make it harder to attract the skilled workers we are going to need to build our way out of this crisis.

    This has been a windfall for residential developers and builders, whose profits have grown 50% faster than either labor or material costs. But it’s been a burden for taxpayers, because poverty wages for construction workers increase spending on Medicaid and other public assistance programs by tens of millions of dollars every year.

    Housing reforms that fail to include prevailing wage standards will only make these problems worse. 

    Long associated with more local hiring and stronger economic outcomes, prevailing wages are the local market based minimum wage for skilled construction work. By raising the “floor,” these standards can help close the affordability gap by pulling thousands of construction workers out of poverty and reducing income disparities that disproportionately impact people of color.

    Most research shows prevailing wage standards do not increase total project costs. Instead, they reduce worksite waste and improve productivity by as much as 16%. And with profits now representing a larger share of total residential construction costs than workers’ wages and benefits, it is clear that the industry is well positioned to make the workforce investments that are needed to close the affordability gap.

    Real housing reform needs to do more than simply streamline more development. We need to promote investment in the people who are doing the building, and struggling to pay the rent in our communities.

    Please include prevailing wage standards in your state housing reform package.

  • Your profile picture
    2:02pm

    Affordable Housing

    Prevailing wage needs to be included in housing reform to help close the affordability gap. 

    Dear Governor Brown and California State Legislators:

    To solve California’s housing crisis, we must take steps to increase our housing supply and close the affordability gap for working families.

    We can make real progress by incorporating prevailing wage standards into state housing reforms.

    Housing prices have soared as much as 54% faster than inflation over the past twenty years, but real wages for nearly a million Californians who work in the construction industry have actually declined by 25%. The median wage of $35,000 per year prices most construction workers out of the housing market—particularly in high cost coastal cities.

    In fact, most are immigrants and people of color earning $.70 on the dollar of similarly skilled white workers. Nearly half have no health insurance, and one in six face some form of wage theft.

    Most research shows that low wages reduces productivity and invites workforce shortages. It takes 13% more workers today to equal California’s construction output of twenty years ago. Low wages will make it harder to attract the skilled workers we are going to need to build our way out of this crisis.

    This has been a windfall for residential developers and builders, whose profits have grown 50% faster than either labor or material costs. But it’s been a burden for taxpayers, because poverty wages for construction workers increase spending on Medicaid and other public assistance programs by tens of millions of dollars every year.

    Housing reforms that fail to include prevailing wage standards will only make these problems worse. 

    Long associated with more local hiring and stronger economic outcomes, prevailing wages are the local market based minimum wage for skilled construction work. By raising the “floor,” these standards can help close the affordability gap by pulling thousands of construction workers out of poverty and reducing income disparities that disproportionately impact people of color.

    Most research shows prevailing wage standards do not increase total project costs. Instead, they reduce worksite waste and improve productivity by as much as 16%. And with profits now representing a larger share of total residential construction costs than workers’ wages and benefits, it is clear that the industry is well positioned to make the workforce investments that are needed to close the affordability gap.

    Real housing reform needs to do more than simply streamline more development. We need to promote investment in the people who are doing the building, and struggling to pay the rent in our communities.

    Please include prevailing wage standards in your state housing...

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Wednesday, May 24

  • Your profile picture
    5:21pm
    Changes to Title
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    BAC Local 4 California
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    BAC Local #4 So. California
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    5:19pm
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    Image: bac_320-170.png
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    Image: local_4.jpg
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    5:14pm
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    Image: pgerb.jpg
      
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  • Your profile picture
    5:14pm
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    Danney Garcia
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    Danny Garcia
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    5:13pm
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    5:13pm
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  • Your profile picture
    5:12pm
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  • Your profile picture
    5:08pm
    PGerber updated Join BAC
    ...
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    Contact Local #4 for information on joining the Union (626) 739-5600
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    *Contact Local #4 for information on joining the Union (626) 739-5600*
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    Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers Local #4 is located in the city of Arcadia, California.
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     Our local covers the counties of Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego, Imperial, Riverside, San Bernardino, Inyo, Mono, Tulare, Kern, Ventura, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara.We represent bricklayers, stone and marble masons, refractory specialists, restoration masons and pointers/caulkers/cleaners. And as of June 1st 2016, tile, marble and terrazzo.
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    What does becoming a member offer you?
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    A union wage negotiated with increases
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    Health and welfare benefits for you, your spouse and your dependents that includes quality medical, vision, and dental
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    Paid pension plans
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    Representation for safer working conditions and grievances
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    Sociability (Fishing trips, picnics, sporting events, political events, etc.)
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  • Your profile picture
    5:02pm
    Too many differences to list. See Revisions for details.
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